Green 8 Gold Mobile Cellular 3G Radiation Protection

 

 

My Laser Eye Surgery Experience – 41001

by other on July 28, 2011

There are different types of Laser Eye Surgery and your eye consultant will tell you what is most appropriate for you.

 

The surgery itself is over in under 15 minutes which is what surprised me.

 

Lots of people get both eyes treated at the same time however in my case, I got the left eye operated on first, with the right eye a couple of weeks later.

 

Your own eye consultant will advise you on the pros and cons and finally it will be your decision.

 

A few people have asked me about my experiences so I’ve prepared this brief account of my experience.  I hope that it will help you address some of your fears or reservations.

 

I met with my surgeon  a few weeks before the treatment. He explained the surgery and explained what I could expect and he also highlighted the risks.

 

The principal risk was the halo effect which is when you see a halo around lights at night.

 

Although I was very nervous on the day of the surgery, I was put at ease by the nurse and escorted into the theatre

 

There was an operating table with the laser machine standing towards the top of it, above the head area.

 

You are given a temporary head covering to put on to prevent contamination from your hair.

 

The next stage in the process, the doctor was to clamp my eye open, which was quite a strange feeling.  It is odd not being able to blink.

 

At this stage the eye consultant will thoroughly douse your eye with cold water and then apply pain killing drops so you will feel no pain.

 

The only feeling I sensed was the cold water.

 

You will find that you can’t help blinking as the cold water is applied, but actually, the clamp doesn’t permit that.

 

Once your eye has been prepared, the laser is lined up.

 

I asked the surgeon how he would keep the laser steady but he let me know that it was computer controlled and all he had to do was flick a switch.  This reassured me to a degree.

 

The surgeon  positioned my head to align the laser over my eye, and once aligned correctly a nurse took over to try and keep my head from further movement.

 

As you lay on the table looking at the laser you should see a red light.  This isn’t the laser, but the doctor will ask you to confirm that you can see it.

 

You should try and stare this light and not look away from it.

 

Keeping your eye on this red light is very difficult because the eye has a tendency to wander, especially when numbed.

 

My main problem was the laser going off target and hurting my eye, however, there’s an automatic safety cut off switch which comes into play if your eye moves, you don’t need to be worried about this.

 

The surgeon will inform you he is ready to commence the surgery and start the laser in intermittent pulses.

 

These only last a few seconds at a time and you can’t see or feel anything from the laser.

 

I must warn you that you will detect a burning smell as the tissue is burned from your eye.

 

It doesn’t last long, but I can still remember that smell after many years!

 

After a few more blasts of the laser, the surgery is complete.

 

All in all, the entire operation took under half an hour.  Afterwards I was allowed to leave and drive home taking some eye drops and pain killers.

 

They also gave me a temporary bandage contact lens to reduce any pain and help eliminate the risk of infection.

 

After a few days I went back to the hospital to have the lens removed.

 

These bandage contact lens also reduce any discomfort you might get from blinking and let you to see clearly almost immediately after the surgery.

 

After being very worried and nervous about the treatment, I can verify it went without a hitch and was a complete success.  A few weeks later I had the right eye operated on.

 

If I was doing this again, I would have both eyes done at the same time because you have to get new glasses with one plain lens and a prescription lens and getting used to them was quite hard for the first few days.

 

Be Sociable, Share!

Leave a Comment

Security Code:

Previous post:

Next post: